The Cross

St. Joseph’s Cemetery in San Antonio has a variety of grave markers in the form of a cross—the universal symbol for Christianity.  The crosses come in many different styles, shapes from plain to very elaborate.

HIER

RUHT

IN

GOTT

MARIA HOFACKER

GEBORNE NENTWIG

GEB

26

DEZ

1856

GEST

OKT

1913

This cast iron cross shape is a Latin cross with rays emanating out from the crossbars and is called a Glory Cross.   The rays symbolize God’s glory.   It makes use of the shape by stacking the words in the vertical bars and running the deceased name along the horizontal bar.

In Loving Memory

FLORENCE O. BROUSSARD

MARCH 10, 1902

FEBRUARY 16, 1931

The iron cross is almost fanciful with the heart shape in the center.  The heart shape is repeated in the arms of the cross.

Robert Salm

Geb. Mai 1 – 1855

Geft. Marz 19 –

1898

This elaborate iron cross was enameled at one time, though, most has been eroded.  This cross is adorned with a winged cherub.

The winged cherub was a symbol that became popular in the 18th Century.  Winged cherubs replaced the stark and morbid flying death’s heads from our Puritan forefathers.  The cherubs have a childlike countenance of innocence.  The iconography represents the flight of the soul from the body upward to Heaven and the hope of the resurrection.

This iron cross has an intricate design that crisscrosses the vertical and horizontal arms of the cross.  At the bottom of the cross is a chalice with a wafer.  The chalice and the wafer represent the blood and the body of Christ.

This marker, crafted from wood, is shaped into a Botonee Cross.  The Botonee Cross is characterized by a trefoil at the end of each arm of the cross which symbolizes the Holy Trinity.

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