Category Archives: Uncategorized

A Daughter’s Tribute to Her Artist Father

JAMES M. HART N. A. MAY 10, 1828 OCT. 24, 1901 James McDougal Hart was a 19th Century landscape artist born in Scotland who immigrated to America with his family as a small boy.  After a stint as an apprentice … Continue reading

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The Sleeping Babe

RITA SCALANTE Oct. 12, 1898 Nov. 28, 1910 This white-marble monument in the St. Francis Cemetery at Phoenix, Arizona, memorializes the life of an infant girl who died shortly after her second birthday.  A drapery on the top of the … Continue reading

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You Don’t See Those Much Any More!

William Hayes Fogg (1817 – 1884) and his brother, Hiram (1812 – 1860), share a gray granite obelisk in the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.  After trade with Japan opened up, the Fogg brothers founded a trading company to … Continue reading

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Buried Four Times!

High on a bluff overlooking the Missouri River, just south of what is present-day Sioux City, Iowa, stands the towering monument to Sergeant Charles Floyd, the only person to die during the Lewis and Clark Expedition. President Thomas Jefferson enlisted … Continue reading

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The Empty Chair

The gray-marble tufted chair in the Oakland Cemetery in Petersburg, Illinois, has FATHER carved on the front of the upholstered seat cushion.  The highl- elaborate, Victorian-style stone chair gravestone is a memorial for Richard C. Trenary (December 16, 1829 – … Continue reading

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Praying Hands and the Rosary

The Rosary is a prayer to the Mother Mary with a tradition that dates back to St. Dominic in the 1200s.  This symbol, combined with praying hands, is Catholic and predominately found on the gravestones of Catholics.  The Rosary as … Continue reading

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Help!

In Victorian times, flowers took on significance as a way to send coded messages; this was known as floriography from the Latin combining flora—“goddess of flowers” and graphein—“writing”.  Each flower had a meaning that was conveyed to the viewer or … Continue reading

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