Monthly Archives: August 2012

Our Drummer Boy

The Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut, produced “white bronze” cemetery markers and monuments in a wide assortment of sizes and shapes including statues like the one produced for and in the likeness of 12-year old Clarence Mackenzie found at the … Continue reading

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American Bronze

The Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut, set up their first subsidary in Detroit, Michigan.  Others followed in Philadelphia, New Orleans, St. Thomas, Ontario, Des Moines, and Chicago.  The Chicago subsidary was named the American Bronze Company and the characteristic … Continue reading

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“White Bronze”

The Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut, produced what was billed as white bronze cemetery markers from the 1870s until 1912.  The markers are distinguished by their bluish-gray tint.  The markers are not bronze but actually cast zinc.  The zinc … Continue reading

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Lily of the Valley

On the back of this bluish-gray marker in the Greenbush Cemetery at Lafayette, Indiana, a delicate hand holds a lily of the valley sprig. The lily of the valley is much like other lilies in funerary art as a symbol … Continue reading

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Shock of Wheat

Carved on top of this white marble monument for Herman and Elizabeth Aldrich in the Green-Wood Cemetery at Brooklyn, New York, is a great shock of wheat. Wheat’s origins are unknown but is the basis of basic food and a … Continue reading

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President Millard Fillmore

When John Tyler became the president after the death of William Henry Harrison, he was referred to by the political wags of the day as “His Accidency.”  Millard Fillmore was the second president to ascend to the office upon the … Continue reading

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Tree-stump gravestone: Fireman

Tree stump tombstones, generally carved from limestone, were a part of the rustic movement of the mid-nineteenth century which was characterized by designs that were made to look like they were from the country. The gravestones are purposefully designed to … Continue reading

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Grant’s Tomb, part 2

Grant’s Tomb was dedicated on April 27th, 1897, President Grant’s 75th anniversary of his birth.  His mausoleum was to be the centerpiece of Riverside Park.  For many years it was a gathering place.  But by the 1970s the tomb had … Continue reading

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Grant’s Tomb

President Ulysses S. Grant died of throat cancer July 23, 1885, only 4 days after he finished writing his memoirs, Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant.  He was mired in debt from financial catastrophes and bad investments, but Mark Twain’s … Continue reading

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The Inverted Torch

The tombstones in these two photos are both taken in the Union Cemetery at St. Clairsville, Ohio.  In both cases, the tombstones display elaborately carved figures leaning on an inverted torch. In the example above, a chubby baby boy sits … Continue reading

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