The Good Shepherd

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ANGELINE

CLARK

DIED

AUG 28, 1854

AGED 3 Y’S,

5 M’S, 16 D’S.

The lamb is the symbol of the Lord, the Good Shepherd, which comes from the Bible passage, Psalm 23:1-6.

The lamb also represents innocence, likely the reason why this motif usually adorns the tombstones of infants and young children such as this one for Angeline Clark buried in the Melott Cemetery in rural Brown County, Indiana.  Most often the lamb is lying down, often asleep and sometimes with a cross behind the lamb. Here the lamb in accompanied by a little girl, presumably the visage of little Angeline.

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~Psalms 23:1-6~

The LORD is my Shepherd, I shall not want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures,

He leads me beside quiet waters,

He restores my soul.

He guides me in paths of righteousness for His name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for You are with me;

Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies.

You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.

Surely goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, And I will dwell in the house of the LORD forever.

Amen.

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Pain

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A LA MEMOIRE

DE LEON PHILIPPE BECLARD

COMMANDEUR DE LA LEGION D’HONNEUR

DECEDE A TANGER LE 7 MARS 1864

DANS SA 43EME ANNEE

LEONIE MARIE BECLARD DECEDEE A UN AN

MARIE BECLARD NEE DE KATARGI

DECEDEE LE 10 APRIL 1867 DANS SA 28EME ANNEE

PAUL BECLARD

ANCIEN SOUS LIEUTENANT DE CAVALERIE

DECEDE LE 14 AVRIL 1893

A L AGE DE 30 ANNEE

Minister Plenipotentiary and also Minister of Finance to Emperor Napoleon III Philippe Leon Beclard (born in 1820) died in Tangier. His tomb in Le Père Lachaise Cemetery was created by famed French artist, Gustave Désiré Adolphe Crauk.

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The tomb features a mourning figure common in many Victorian cemeteries. The mourning figures are nearly always beautiful, young women overcome by grief, limp from sorrow. Here the mourning figure, her head lowered and resigned with loss, accepts the reality of death as she clutches a stele with the bas-relief of the deceased. The name of the sculpture atop the tomb says it all; it is called Pain.

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Eternal Silence

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The elaborate monument of A. Florens (1873-1885) in the Le Père Lachaise Cemetery honors a 12-year old child. The tomb, replete with symbolism, features a small limestone sarcophagus that sits in front of a sculpture flanked by two Ionic columns of pink granite holding up a decorative cornice that frames the top of the tomb.

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The centerpiece of the monument is a white-marble bas-relief of a bare-breasted mourning figure half covered in billowing drapery who appears to be floating above the child’s sarcophagus. She holds one finger to her lips almost as if she is warning passersby to be quiet as the young child sleeps.  This also can be a sign of eternal silence.

She gently drops delicate flowers with her other hand. This act is a recurring funerary motif designed to remind the viewer that life is short.  Many funerary symbols from that time period expressed the transitory nature of life–how one could be strong and vital one day and dead the next. The sculpture of the young woman placing flowers on graves recreates a tradition begun by the ancient Greeks and Romans that we practice to this day.

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DIY

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FAMILEE ALLOUARD

MARIE MARADAN NEE CARSON 54 ANS

ANTOINE ALLOUARD 1815 – 30 DECEMBRE 1891

MARIE ALLOUARD NEE DAON 1843 – 1920

HENRI ALLOUARD 1844 – 1929

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The best way to assure that you get what you want on your tombstone is, of course, to do it yourself, which is exactly what famed French sculptor Henri Emile Allouard did. He sculpted a magnificent bronze of a young girl dressed in a sleeping gown kneeling on a pillow as she prays. There is a wreath that drapes the end of the pillow. The bronze is atop of his family tomb in Le Père Lachaise at Paris, France.

Allouard was best known for sculptures that combined materials such as colored marble and bronze into one work of art. He was a prize-winning artist receiving a gold medal at the Exposition Universelle. His tomb sculpture demonstrates the maturity and skill of his talent.

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Race to the Finish

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Before the Indy 500, and before the Grand Prix, there was the Gordon Bennett Cup, Europe’s first great car race which ran for 6 years from 1900 until 1905. For the last two years of the race, 1904 and 1905, Leon Thery (16 April 1879 – 8 March 1909), a mechanic and race car driver, won the competition.

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Thery’s first big race occurred in 1899—the Bordeaux to Paris Race. He drove a tiller-steered Decauville a whopping 19 miles per hour to come in second on the 351 mile course arriving exhausted, delirious, and suffering from amnesia. These early days of racing were hair raising with cars careening around mountains on unpaved roads, dodging pedestrians, other racing cars, and farm animals. However, occasionally, the drivers were befallen with bad luck. In 1902, a brake failure around a mountain pass and the misfortune of Thery hitting a hog going full speed ended his hopes for winning the Ardennes Cup.

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In spite of Thery’s early misfortunes, he continued on and eventually won the Gordon Bennett Cup, not once but twice, driving a Richard-Brasier to the finish line and becoming a French Race Car hero. Though Thery continued to race he never again won a race. He died at 29 of tuberculosis and was buried at Le Père Lachaise with a monument that honors his racing career.

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Rub it

For single Parisian women who are yearning to get married or married women who are wanting a better sex life there is one monument in Le Père Lachaise that can help, or so the legend goes….

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Yvan Salmon was born July 27, 1848 in Attigny, Vosges, France. Yvan adopted the pen name of Victor Noir and moved to Paris to work as a journalist for the La Marseillaise newspaper. La Revanche and L’Avenir de la Corse, two newspapers on the tiny island of Corsica became embroiled in a duel of words which eventually spilled out into the streets of Paris. The Paris newspaper that Victor worked for La Marseillaise sided with La Revanche which had printed incendiary criticisms of Napoleon I. Prince Bonaparte wrote to the offending editor of the newspaper and called them cowards. The imbroglio eventually involved Parschal Grousset who was challenged to a duel by Prince Bonaparte. Grousset sent Victor Noir and Ulrich de Fonvielle as his seconds to work out the details of the duel—time, place, etc. But instead of working it out with the Prince’s seconds as custom would have dictated, the two men went to the Prince’s home to speak to him directly. Something happened at the Prince’s home, the details are disputed, but Victor Noir ended up dead, shot by the Prince. Those against King Napoleon III’s unpopular regime were outraged and saw the Prince’s actions and acquittal as royal privilege.

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January 11, 1870 in Paris, this little known newspaperman became a cause celeb—thousands of Republicans followed his casket to his first grave in a cemetery in Neuilly, France.

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That September the King was overthrown and eventually France established a Republican government. In 1891, Noir, not forgotten by the Republicans, commissioned Jules Dalou, the great French sculptor, to create a bronze statue to honor the fallen journalist and his body was moved to Le Père Lachaise.

The monument to the fallen hero is that of a fallen man. Victor Noir is depicted laid out flat, top hat next to him. Dalou sculpted Noir, as was his practice, very realistically. But the folds in Victor’s trousers make it appear as if he has an erection or at the very least, is a very well-endowed man. A myth grew up around the statue that if a woman kissed his lips and rubbed his “talisman” they would be rewarded with fertility and a better sex life. Some versions of the myth promise single women marriage within a year if the women also leave a flower in his hat.

The myth became so popular that for a time the cemetery officials fenced Victor’s statue to preserve it. But the outcry was so great the fence was removed and women once again made the pilgrimage to Victor’s grave. It is clear from the burnished parts of the monument where the patina has been rubbed off that the myth is alive and well.

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Stylistic Juxtaposition

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Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (26 April 1798 – 13 August 1863) was a French romantic artist, influenced by the round and plump figures painted by Reubens, is now most famous for a painting he created titled, Liberty Leading the People. The painting portrays a bare-breasted woman, the allegorical figure of liberty, who carries the Tri-color and leads the French peasants in revolt in 1830 against Charles X.  Delacroix’s version of events depicts the peasants as heroic characteristic of his romantic style and in stark contrast to the neoclassical style that was also in vogue at the time.

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His black granite sarcophagus is modeled after the Roman tomb of Lucius Cornelius Scipio Barbatus. The Scipio sarcophagus was erected around 150 BC.  Lucius Cornelius Scipio Barbatus (died c. 280 BC) was one of the two elected Roman consuls in 298 BC. Scipio’s tomb is now preserved in the Vatican Museum in Rome, Italy. Though Delacroix led the romantic painters into creating a newer style, his tomb is decidedly classical.

Le Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France

Le Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France

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